Family Counselor Advice

Sharon Scott, LPC, LMFT

One of the children’s books I authored is titled Nicholas’ Values:  A Child’s Guide to Character Education. {Editor’s

Note:  This is excellent reading for your elementary-age child!  Order at 800-822-2801 or www.hrdpress.com/sharonscott}  Nicholas is my cocker spaniel who “co-authored” a series of five books for elementary-age children each teaching a different valuable living skill.  In this particular book he uses funny and touching true stories about animals who have shown good character.  The character traits that Nicholas presents in the book make an acronym of his name:  Nice, Involved, Confident, Honest, Obedient, Loyal, Accountable, and Sharing.

 

For example, the value of “being involved” is exhibited by a lady who takes her boxer dogs to visit nursing homes and children’s hospitals.  The dogs, Trudy and Fanci, have many darling costumes they wear.  At one hospital, a very ill girl whispered to Trudy for an hour while Trudy quietly lay next to her.  And at a nursing home the residents learned that Trudy was very ill herself.  They chipped in and bought her a bed so that she would have a place to rest when she visited.  Those being helped then became the helpers.

Volunteer efforts can and should be started young.  It’s natural for a young child to want to help others and gives so much pleasure to all involved.  It also helps to avoid a child feeling entitled and that the world revolves around them.  I’ve seen many a high school teen doing volunteer work so it will look good on a college application.  It was not about helping, but still about him or her.  Had helping been taught at a young age, the feeling experienced would not have been so self-centered.

Think about an organization or agency that needs help and allows children (remember to check age requirements as they vary).  Discuss with your child how they might enjoy helping with you and why it’s important to help others.  An animal shelter?  Hospital?  Habitat for Humanity?  Food bank?  Church coat drive?  Hope you and your child get involved soon—and reap the pleasure of being involved and making a difference!

Copyright © 2012, Sharon Scott.  No reproduction without written permission from author.

PS See this month's other column, Counselor's Corner about the Brain's Pleasure Center.

Sharon Scott

Sharon Scott

Sharon is the author of eight award-winning books including four on the topic of peer to peer pressure.

The guide for parents/educators on how to peer-proof children and teens is Peer Pressure Reversal: An Adult Guide to Developing a Responsible Child, 2nd Ed.

Her popular book for teens, How to Say No and Keep Your Friends, 2nd Ed., empowers kids to stand out,not just fit in!

A follow-up book for teens, When to Say Yes! And Make More Friends, shows adolescents how to select and meet quality friends and, in general, feel good for doing and being good.

Sharon also has a charming series of five books for elementary-age children each teaching an important living skill and "co-authored" with her savvy cocker spaniel Nicholas who makes the learning fun.Their book on managing elementary-age peer pressure is titled Too Smart for Trouble.
Sharon Scott
Sharon Scott, LPC, LMFTSmileNotescharacter development,child,compassion,involvedSharon Scott, LPC, LMFT One of the children’s books I authored is titled Nicholas’ Values:  A Child’s Guide to Character Education. {Editor’s Note:  This is excellent reading for your elementary-age child!  Order at 800-822-2801 or www.hrdpress.com/sharonscott}  Nicholas is my cocker spaniel...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities