sleeping teen
Photo by Carlos57

By Sylvia Cochran – 

Can you believe that the start of daylight savings time is just around the corner? For the parent of toddlers and preschoolers, this is a much-feared upset in sleep routines that is bound to cause a few sleep-deprived mornings and unhappy bedtimes. Yet did you know that it is not just the routine-driven younger set that is going to be in for a few rude awakenings? Helping your adolescent with the adjustment can be just as important for the parent who wants to ensure that the budding teens are getting their needed rest.

Changing the Body Clock

You can hedge your bets by working with your adolescent’s body clock. Assuming that your preteen or young teen is still cooperative with your suggestions, gradually change the bedtime in 10-minute increments. Although only a small step for the duration of a week, it will help on the day that the clock moves forward for real.

Working with the Mind

John 14:1 counsels the believers should not to let their hearts be troubled by the worries of the day. Psalm 121:3-4 explains that God will never sleep but watches over the believer. Yet it is Psalm 127:2 that might pinpoint the problem that some adolescents have with adjusting successfully to a new sleep routine. Talking about rising early and resting late, there is the mention of anxiety.

When your preteen or teen goes to sleep before his body clock signals tiredness, the time spent lying down while still awake may allow worries, fears and negative thoughts to creep in. Whereas in the past the body was too tired to allow the mind to wander in this manner, this is not necessarily true with the change in routine. It is here that frequent talks, hugs and inquiries about anything that could trouble a youngster will pay off.

Helping with Surroundings

Enforce the texting ban. If you have been a bit lax in the past, make sure that your child’s phone is now turned off at bedtime so that friends who may also have trouble with falling asleep do not keep each other awake. Darker curtains may also help. Finally, insist on a no-media period of 30 minutes prior to bedtime.

Let your youngster take this half hour period to read, pray or get things ready for the next day. Reducing the availability of stimuli before bedtime is a good method for helping a mind find rest.

Sylvia Cochran

Sylvia is a seasoned freelance writer, born and raised in Germany. Having been exposed to a variety of religions and traditions due to travel and study, Sylvia has been a student of the Bible for more than ten years, and has for the last four years taught in small groups about Biblical principles, practical Christianity, Christian parenting, as well as the spiritual use of money. Sylvia also provides Free Online Christian Parenting Courses at Suite 101
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