pregnancy

By Greta Jenkins

New information about what you can do during pregnancy to give your baby the best chance of a healthy life.

Environmental Hazards

There are two newly identified pre-natal health risks:

The chemical BPA and exposure to high magnetic field levels.  BPA, Bisphenol-A, has been linked to cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes and liver-enzyme abnormalities. In fact, since 2008, the Canadian government has warned pregnant women to avoid food containers which are made with BPA, such as plastic lined tin cans.

Tip: Use only BPA Free plastic food containers

Pregnant women in Kaiser Permanente’s Northern California region carried a meter measuring magnetic field levels during pregnancy. Their children, numbering 733, were followed up to 13 years, to collect clinically recorded information on growth patterns. On average, 33 weight measurements per child were done.  Findings indicate that electromagnetic fields, from microwave ovens to countless wireless devices, may be contributing to childhood obesity risk. More info here kp.org/newscenter.

Tip: Limit exposure to microwaves, cell phone and other wireless devices. The world is full of these devices so don’t panic!  Make common sense changes, boil water  tea, heat up left overs in a pan, don’t put the cell one in your pocket or carry near your belly. Try to totally unplug more often, it’s good for your mind and spirit too.

Fetal alcohol syndrome and babies experiencing drug withdrawal is still a problem nationwide. Be sure to avoid alcohol and street drugs and only take over the counter and prescription drugs with the knowledge and consent of your doctor.

Other things to avoid: Cigarettes, Caffeine, Vitamin A Supplements, Pesticides and Paint.

Protecting Against Birth Defects

Prenatal vitamins that include folic acid are essential to protect against Spinal Bifida.  Folic acid also has many other beneficial effects on your pregnancy.

Tip: Take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid per day,

Keeping Fit

Try to get 2 and half hours of exercise a week or about 30 minutes a day. it helps with stress, weight gain and builds stamina that you will need for the birth process and taking care of your newborn.

The March of Dimes recommends that your stop exercising and contact your doctor if any of the following occur:

Bleeding from vagina

Dizziness

Headache

Chest pains

Muscle weakness

Calf pain or swelling

Preterm labor

Decreased movement of the fetus

Leakage of fluid from your vagina

Tip: 30 minutes of exercise a day

Morning Sickness

Most common during the first thee month of pregnancy, but morning sickness may never complexly go away for some. 70 to 85% of all pregnant women report that they experience nausea, vomiting or other digestive problems. Often the best treatment according to the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH) are vitamin B6, ginger and ondansetron in your diet. 

Tip: vitamin B6, ginger and ondansetron

http://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/wpregnant.jpghttp://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/wpregnant-150x150.jpgAdministratorAges and Stagesavoid,BPA,cell phone,hazards,healthy pregnancy,microwaveBy Greta Jenkins New information about what you can do during pregnancy to give your baby the best chance of a healthy life. Environmental Hazards There are two newly identified pre-natal health risks: The chemical BPA and exposure to...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities