grandpa in sweaterThe nation’s population has a distinctly older age profile than it did 16 years ago, according to new U.S. Census Bureau.  the median age — the age where half of the population is younger and the other half older — rose from 35.3 years on April 1, 2000, to 37.9 years on July 1, 2016.

Residents age 65 and over grew from 35.0 million in 2000, to 49.2 million in 2016, accounting for 12.4 percent and 15.2 percent of the total population, respectively.

The median age is increasing in most areas of the country.

Every state experienced either an increase or had the same median age as a year earlier.

Oldest median age:

  • Maine is the highest in the nation, at 44.6 years,
  • New Hampshire’s is  43.0 years
  • Vermont  is at 42.7 years.

Lowest median ages were in:

  • Utah with a  median age of 30.8 years
  •  Alaska  at  33.9 years
  • District of Columbia  at 33.9 years

Two counties had median ages over 60: Sumter, Fla. (67.1 years), and Catron, N.M. (60.5 years).Sumter, Fla., home to a large retirement community, was the county with the highest median age, and it also showed the highest median age increase. Sumter’s median age jumped from 49.2 years in 2000 to 67.1 years in 2016, an increase of 17.9 years.

middle school kids

 

The population continues to be more diverse.

Nationally, all race and ethnic groups grew between July 1, 2015, and July 1, 2016.

  • The Hispanic population (including all races) grew by 2.0 percent to 57.5 million.
  • The Asian population grew by 3.0 percent to 21.4 million.
  • The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population grew by 2.1 percent to 1.5 million.
  • The American Indian and Alaska Native population grew by 1.4 percent to 6.7 million.
  • The black or African-American population grew by 1.2 percent to 46.8 million.
  • The white population grew by 0.5 percent to 256.0 million.
  • Those who identified as being of two or more races grew by 3.0 percent to 8.5 million.
  • The non-Hispanic white alone population grew by 5,000 people, remaining at 198.0 million.

Deaths continued to exceed births for the non-Hispanic white alone group.

While all other groups experienced natural increase (having more births than deaths) between 2015 and 2016, the non-Hispanic white alone group experienced a natural decrease of 163,300 nationally.

Where We Live

The Hispanic Population (All Races)

  • Among states, California had the largest Hispanic total population (15.3 million) in 2016, while Texas had the largest numeric increase in the Hispanic population (233,100). New Mexico had the highest Hispanic share of its total population at 48.5 percent.
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest Hispanic population (4.9 million) in 2016, while Harris County, Texas, had the largest numeric increase (39,600). Starr County, Texas, had the highest Hispanic share of the population (96.3 percent).

The White Population

  • Among states, California had the largest white population on July 1, 2016 (29.9 million). Texas had the largest numeric increase since 2015 (281,200). Maine had the highest percentage of its population in this group (96.5 percent).
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest white population in 2016 (7.5 million). Maricopa County, Ariz., had the largest numeric increase from last year (59,100). McPherson County, Neb., was the county with the highest white percentage of the population (99.6 percent).

The Black or African-American Population

  • New York had the largest black or African American population of any state or equivalent in 2016 (3.8 million). Texas had the largest numeric increase (91,900). The District of Columbia had the highest percentage of its total population being black or African American (49.4 percent).
  • Among counties, Cook County, Ill. (Chicago), had the largest black or African American population in 2016 (1.3 million). Harris County, Texas, had the largest numeric increase since 2015 (16,400). Claiborne County, Miss., was the county with the highest black or African American percentage of the population in the nation (86.3 percent).

The Asian Population

  • California had the largest Asian population of any state (6.6 million), and the largest numeric increase (152,400). Hawaii had the highest percentage for this group (57.0 percent).
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest Asian population of any county (1.7 million), as well as the largest numeric increase (22,400). Honolulu County, Hawaii, had the highest percentage in the nation for this group (61.3 percent).

The American Indian and Alaska Native Population

  • California had the largest American Indian and Alaska Native population of any state in 2016 (1.1 million), while Texas had the largest numeric increase since July 1, 2015 (10,800). Alaska had the highest percentage (19.9 percent) of the American Indian and Alaska Native population.
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest American Indian and Alaska Native population of any county in 2016 (233,200), and Maricopa County, Ariz., held the greatest increase from the previous year (4,100). Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, had the highest share for this group (91.8 percent).

The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Population

  • Hawaii had the largest Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population of any state in 2016 (381,000). Since 2015, this group increased the most in California (4,900). Hawaii had the highest percentage of its population in this group in 2016 (26.7 percent).
  • Among counties, Honolulu County, Hawaii, had the largest Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population (245,600) in 2016, and Clark County, Nev., had the largest increase during the last year (1,500).

The Population of Two or More Races

  • Among states, more people who identified as being of two or more races lived in California (1.5 million) than in any other state, with an increase of 32,900 from 2015. Hawaii had the highest percentage for this group (23.7 percent).
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest population of two or more races in 2016 (305,000). Maricopa County, Ariz., had the highest numeric increase since 2015 (5,300). Hawaii County, Hawaii, had the highest share for this group (30.1 percent).

The Non-Hispanic White Alone Population

  • Among states, California had the largest non-Hispanic white alone population on July 1, 2016 (14.8 million). Florida had the largest numeric increase since 2015 (114,200). Maine had the highest percentage of its population in this group (93.5 percent).
  • Among counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest non-Hispanic white alone population in 2016 (2.7 million). Maricopa County, Ariz., had the largest numeric increase from last year (24,700). Keya Paha County, Neb., was the county with the highest share of its total population in this group (98.0 percent).

This is the last of the population estimates for 2016. Previously released were estimates of the U.S. population by age and sex, county and metro area population estimates and city and town population estimates.

Geraldine Jensen

Publisher and Editor of Families Online Magazine. Our experts provide warm, loving, and generous advice for you, your family and children, no matter their age -- infants, school age, 'tweens, and teenagers. Features include:Parenting, Ages and Stages of Child Development, Child Support, Cooking, Health, Children's Books, Nutrition, Christian Parenting, Relationships, Green-living, Education and School

Ms. Jensen is a leading advocate for families and children and was the founder and president of ACES, The Association for Children for Enforcement of Support.
https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/senior.jpghttps://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/senior-150x150.jpgGeraldine JensenHot topicage better,city,diverse,older,population,state,USA,where african americans live,where hispanics live,where seniors liveThe nation's population has a distinctly older age profile than it did 16 years ago, according to new U.S. Census Bureau.  the median age — the age where half of the population is younger and the other half older — rose from 35.3 years on April 1, 2000, to 37.9...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities