By Greta Jenkins

May is Share-A-Story Month

New studies report that even in a highly technological, multi-screen world the role of the fairy tale and story-telling is still crucial for a child’s language development. 83% ofFairy Tale Character Puss 'n Boots parents said they still read fairy tales each week, shunning newer technology platforms such as e-books, apps or tablets for the good old-fashioned book. Findings highlight the importance of reading and listening to fairy tales including classics such as Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Rumpelstiltskin.

Increases Vocabulary and Understanding of Diversity

Pediatric Clinical Specialist Speech and Language Therapist Dawn Ralph adds: “Good story telling offers children access to a wealth of knowledge and experiences they may otherwise never be exposed to. This builds up their semantic understanding of the world. It helps expand their knowledge of familiar words and experiences by offering different perspectives and links between things they already know and things that are new and exciting.” Dawn Ralph is co- author with Jacqui Rochester of  Building Language Using LEGO® Bricks: A Practical Guide

TV, Film and Entertainment Industry Helping to Promote Fairy Tales

Fairy tales have also had a resurgence in the world of film and entertainment, with recent block-buster live-action films being made of Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel (Witch Hunters) and Snow White (and The Huntsman). One of London’s newest visitor attractions opened by Merlin Entertainments in conjunction with DreamWorks is “Shrek’s Adventure! London”. Characters such as Cinderella, Rumpelstiltskin, Sleeping Beauty, The Gingerbread Man, Pinocchio and Puss in Boots have been brought to life in a walk-through immersive experience created to bring the fairy tales to life through live actors and storytelling.

General Manager of DreamWorks Tours Shrek’s Adventure! London, Helen Bull, highlights: “Many of the children visiting our attraction are aware of the fairy tales from reading the books with their parents but we’re able to add a new dimension of live interactive story-telling, giving them a modern twist on the tales and actually making them part of the story.”

Parents who read to their children everyday are sure to help their child’s language development and help them become book lovers and better readers.

Greta Jenkins

Greta Jenkins

Greta Jenkins has been writing for Families Online Magazine since 2004. She is a mom, nurse andcommunity volunteer.
Greta Jenkins
https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/shrek.jpghttps://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/shrek-150x150.jpgGreta JenkinsChildren's Books & DVDSchild language development,fairy tales,good reader,read to children,readingBy Greta Jenkins May is Share-A-Story Month New studies report that even in a highly technological, multi-screen world the role of the fairy tale and story-telling is still crucial for a child's language development. 83% of parents said they still read fairy tales each week, shunning newer technology platforms such as...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities