By Anthony G. Alessi,  MD

Telemedicine involves the use of various types of electronic communications to provide medical consultation.  These include videoconferencing, telemetry and electronic health records.

 

These advanced applications of communication can be used in a variety of medical settings to provide a higher level of care and obtain critical information.

The earliest and most widely used setting is to provide consultation in remote areas where medical access is difficult.  In the United States, this technology has helped provide specialty consultation and basic medical information to remote areas like Native American health clinics and military outposts.

Critical care units (CCUs) are known to provide lifesaving care for conditions such as respiratory failure, heart attack and stroke. A recent study demonstrated better outcomes for patients who were hospitalized in units where telemedicine was available.  Patients had fewer days in the CCU and higher survival rates.

Telemedicine can also be disease-specific.  A system known as “Telestroke” is used in emergency rooms throughout the world to rapidly assess patients who have suffered a stroke. This technology helps to determine which patients are candidates for “clot busting” medications that must be administered within 4.5 hours of the onset of symptoms.

Patients who suffer from rarely seen hereditary disorders can obtain care from specialists at major centers around the world.

On a personal note, I have been working with a group to provide neurological care to patients in Haiti.   Each week, local Haitian physicians join our multidisciplinary stroke conference at The William W. Backus Hospital in Norwich, CT to discuss the diagnosis and treatment of patients in Haiti.

Telemedicine is a giant step forward to providing more efficient and complete medical care despite geographic boundaries.


 

Dr. AlessiAnthony G. Alessi, MD, MMM ,graduated from the University of Rome and completed his residency and neuromuscular fellowship at the University of Michigan. He is in private practice in Norwich, CT, specializing inneurology, electrodiagnosticmedicineand sports neurology. He is board-certified in neurology and electrodiagnostic medicine. Dr. Alessi received his Masters degree inMedicalManagement from the Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University in 2001.

He serves as a neurologic consultant to many athletic organizations including the University of Connecticut Athletic Department, Norwich Free Academy and the Connecticut State Boxing Commission.Dr. Alessi also serves as neurologic consultant to the New York Yankees, Detroit Tigers, CT Sun (WNBA) and Hartford Colonials (UFL).

>He is medical director of the William W. Backus Hospital Stroke Center, writes a syndicated column, “HealthySports,” for the Norwich Bulletin and is host of “Neuro Frontiers” on Reach MD XM 160 and “HealthyRounds,” syndicated through WTIC 1080, the Hartford CBS affiliate.

Dr. Alessi’s book, “Healthy Sports: A Doctor’sLessonsfor a Winning Lifestyle,” is a compilation of instructive columns.His most recent book, “Lift Up Your Hearts: Healing Haiti, Land of Hardship,” recounts the work of Dr. Alessi and other medical volunteers after the earthquake in Haiti.Reach him at www.alessimd.com.

 

AdministratorHealthy Roundsapplications,clot busting,consultation,critical care units,electronic health records,medical access,remote areas,Technology,telemedicine,telemetry,telestroke,videoconferencingBy Anthony G. Alessi,  MD Telemedicine involves the use of various types of electronic communications to provide medical consultation.  These include videoconferencing, telemetry and electronic health records.   These advanced applications of communication can be used in a variety of medical settings to provide a higher...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities