baby parentingchild development

Child Development – Ages and Stages 7 Months – 12 Months. Babies develop at their own pace, so it’s impossible to tell exactly when your child will learn a given skill. The developmental steps listed below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect, but don’t be alarmed if your own baby’s development takes a slightly different course.

Child development by the end of 7 Months

Social and Emotional

  • Enjoys social play
  • Watches self in mirror images
  • Responds to other adult’s expressions of emotion and appears joyful often

Cognitive

  • Finds partially hidden object
  • Explores with hands and mouth
  • Tries to get objects that are out of reach

Movement

  • Rolls frontoto back and visa versa
  • Sits with, and then without, support on hands
  • Supports body weight on legs
  • Reaches with one hand
  • Transfers object from hand to hand
  • Uses hand to rake objects

Vision

  • Develops full color vision
  • Distance vision matures
  • Tracks moving objects improves

Language

  • Responds to own name
  • Begins to respond to “no”
  • Can tell emotions by tone of voice
  • Responds to sound by making sounds
  • Uses voice to express joy and displeasure
  • Babbles chains of sounds

Developmental Health Watch
Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any
of the following signs of possible developmental delay for
this age range.

  • Seems very stiff, with tight muscles
  • Seems very floppy, like a rag doll
  • Head still flops back when body is pulled to a sitting position
  • Reaches with one hand only
  • Refuses to cuddle
  • Shows no affection for the person who cares for him or her
  • Doesn’t seem to enjoy being around people
  • One or both eyes consistently turn in or out
  • Persistent tearing, eye drainage, or sensitivity to light
  • Does not respond to sounds around him or her
  • Has difficulty getting objects to mouth
  • Does not turn head to locate sounds by 4 months
  • Does not roll over in either direction (front to back or back to front) by 5 months
  • Seems impossible to comfort at night after 5 months
  • Does not smile on his or her own by 5 months
  • Cannot sit with help by 6 months
  • Does not laugh or make squealing sounds by 6 months
  • Does not actively reach for objects by 6 to 7 months
  • Does not follow objects with both eyes at near (1 foot) and far (6 feet) ranges by 7 months
  • Does not bear weight on legs by 7 months
  • Does not try to attract attention through actions by 7 months
  • Does not babble by 8 months
  • Shows no interest in games of peek-a-boo by 8 months
 

Child development by the end of 12 months

Social and Emotional

  • Shy or anxious with strangers
  • Cries when mother or father leaves
  • Enjoys imitating people in his play
  • Shows specific preferences for certain people and toys
  • Tests parental responses to his actions during feedings
  • Tests parental responses to his behavior
  • May be fearful in some situations
  • Prefers mother and/or regular caregiver over all others
  • Repeats sounds or gestures for attention
  • Finger-feeds himself
  • Extends arm or leg to help when being dressed

Cognitive

  • Explores objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping)
  • Finds hidden objects easily
  • Looks at correct picture when the image is named
  • Imitates gestures
  • Begins to use objects correctly (drinking from cup, brushing hair, dialing phone, listening to receiver)

Language

  • Pays increasing attention to speech
  • Responds to simple verbal requests
  • Responds to “no”
  • Uses simple gestures, such as shaking head for “no”
  • Babbles with inflection (changes in tone)
  • Says “dada” and “mama”
  • Uses exclamations, such as “Oh-oh!”
  • Tries to imitate words

Movement

  • Reaches sitting position without assistance
  • Crawls forward on belly
  • Assumes hands-and-knees position
  • Creeps on hands and knees
  • Gets from sitting to crawling or prone (lying on stomach) position
  • Pulls self up to stand
  • Walks holding on to furniture
  • Stands momentarily without support
  • May walk two or three steps without support

Hand and Finger Skills

  • Uses pincer grasp
  • Bangs two objects together
  • Puts objects into container
  • Takes objects out of container
  • Lets objects go voluntarily
  • Pokes with index finger
  • Tries to imitate scribbling

Developmental Health Watch
Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any
of the following signs of possible developmental delay for
this age range.

  • Does not crawl
  • Drags one side of body while crawling (for over one month)
  • Cannot stand when supported
  • Does not search for objects that are hidden while he or she watches
  • Says no single words (“mama” or “dada”)
  • Does not learn to use gestures, such as waving or shaking head
  • Does not point to objects or pictures

 

child development

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baby 3 -6 months

7 - 12 month text on baby block

toddler 12 months -3 years

preschool text on child's block

school age text on blockpreteen, adolescent, ''tween

teen teenagers

Toddler Won’t Eat? Try These Healthy Toddler Treats and Meals for Toddlers

Homemade Baby Food

 

Finger Food Mania

 

Textures Baby Food

 

Introducing Solid Foods

 

Healthy Toddler Treat: Blueberries N’ Banana Cream

 

Toddler Meal:Cranberry Dip

 

Healthy Toddler Pear Nog

 

Toddler Meals with Sunflower Butter or Seeds

 

Meal Serving Sizes for Toddlers

 

Meal for Toddler: Cauliflower Soup

 

Healthy Toddler Meal: Carrots and Cashews

 

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https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/baby-aimoko.jpghttps://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/baby-aimoko-150x150.jpgJoan McCrayAges and StagesBaby Care and DevelopmentAges and Stages,Emotional and Social Well-being,ParentingChild Development - Ages and Stages 7 Months - 12 Months. Babies develop at their own pace, so it's impossible to tell exactly when your child will learn a given skill. The developmental steps listed below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect, but...Parenting and Family Fun Activities for Kids