Parenting https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids Fri, 26 Jul 2019 18:04:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2016/04/ipad-icon-e1461272681961.jpg Parenting https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com 32 32 Why Is My Kid So Grumpy All The Time? https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/grumpy-child/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=grumpy-child Fri, 26 Jul 2019 18:04:00 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=22164 Families Online Magazine -

Sometimes, it’s tough to navigate your own feelings, let alone the feelings of your grumpy child. But, as the adult, it is on you to determine why your child is […]

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mom and grumpy child

Sometimes, it’s tough to navigate your own feelings, let alone the feelings of your grumpy child. But, as the adult, it is on you to determine why your child is acting out and figure out if you can—or should—fix their grumpiness. However, I totally understand that it is easier said than done.

If you are mystified by your child’s grumpy behavior, here are some reasons which may help you figure out what is going on with your kid.  

Undergoing Constant Changes Can Be Tough

Early childhood and adolescence is a time of constant change. Bodies are growing, hormonal changes are being made, new things are learned, and thousands of other things are going on for kids. With that kind of constant change and growth, it’s no wonder kids go through grumpy spells. 

For example, say that you have a teenager that is going through their first breakup. As an adult, you have the ability to put early relationships into their proper perspective, but you only learned that through going through your own painful experiences. For your kid, this is their learning time, and in the case of many life lessons, the learning doesn’t always go smoothly. 

In cases where change is the source of your child’s grumpiness, being patient, and offering your support is one of the best things you can do for them. 

Struggling With Getting Enough Rest

When children don’t get enough rest, grumpiness is a natural result. Any parent of a toddler can attest to this phenomenon, but if your kid is older, it may come as a surprise. But, no matter what your kid may claim about not needing much sleep, children who are between the ages 3-12 years old should be sleeping 10-11 hours, with children ages 12-18 sleeping 8-9 hours a night.

In addition to the various reasons that can prevent children from getting enough sleep (including technology, distractions, night terrors, activities that run late, disruptive siblings or pets, etc) there is also the potential that your child has obstructive sleep apnea. This causes them to have their airway blocked until they wake up to restart their breathing, causing many micro sleep disruptions in just one night.

If you aren’t sure that children can get sleep apnea, you may be surprised to know that research has pointed out that pediatric sleep apnea is an often overlooked sleep disorder among children. Signs that your child may have sleep apnea are:

  • Often snore loudly
  • Restless sleeper
  • Has difficulty focusing during the day
  • Stops breathing or gasps
  • Bedwetting
  • Excessive sweating during the night

Forgetting To Consistently Discipline 

None of us are always on top of our parenting game, and it can lead to inconsistent discipline with our children. Without consistently applied discipline and consequences, children can feel like their parents are being unfair and arbitrary, leading to demonstrations of grumpy behavior.

Pediatric research on effective discipline emphasizes that children need consistent discipline, as it will build up your kid’s trust and respect in your parenting. More than anything, it is important that consequences for misbehavior are in alignment with the severity of the problem. 

Sometimes It’s Best To Ignore Grumpiness

Lastly, there are times where it can be best to just ignore your child’s grumpy attitude. While helicopter parents may try to manage everything their children do, doing this leaves children without the ability to manage their own emotions and actions. So, instead of rushing to fix things and correct your kid’s grumpiness, try leaving them alone to figure things out on their own.

Throughout the process of determining why your kid is so grumpy lately, be sure to keep the lines of communication open. Sometimes children lack the ability to communicate why they feel the way do, and it is important that you are available if your child is ready to try and talk with you about the problem. 

By doing these things, along with effective communication, you should be able to reach the heart of your kid’s grumpy behavior. 

 

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5 Ways To Help Your Child Learn To Focus https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/child-learn-focus/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=child-learn-focus Sat, 06 Jul 2019 00:52:55 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=22154 Families Online Magazine -

By Tyler Jacobson All children have to learn how to focus. However, for some children, it can be harder, especially if they have a behavioral disorder or are struggling with […]

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mom and child folding clothes

By Tyler Jacobson

All children have to learn how to focus. However, for some children, it can be harder, especially if they have a behavioral disorder or are struggling with emotional issues. 

If your child has been struggling with their focus, here are five ways you can positively help your child learn how to focus. 

1. Make Sure The Assignment Is Clear

Whether your child needs to clean their room or work on homework, it is important that you make sure that they understand their assignment. From the lofty point of being a parent, it can seem like the instructions are clear if you say something like, “Go clean your room.”

 

But for children who struggle to focus, cleaning their room can be an insurmountable mountain where they don’t know where to start, particularly if they are messy. It can lead to a spiral where you may find them cleaning baseboards while their toys and clothes are still on the floor.

 

Instead of leaving the assignment open-ended, give your child two to three clear instructions regarding what you want them to do. Carrying the room cleaning example, you could tell them, “Go pick up all your clothes and toys, and make sure to make the bed.” As your child learns to focus on smaller tasks, they can learn to do that on their own. 

2. Help Your Child Organize 

Much like breaking up tasks, helping your child to learn organizational skills can assist in honing their focus. 

 

For instance, even with clear directions on what you expect when you tell your child to clean their room, without organization, the work will likely take a long time. And as you’ve probably seen, if something takes time to complete, the more likely your child will lose focus and leave the work incomplete.

 

I have found my youngest son terribly frustrated as he tried to follow my directions and put away his clothes. But his hangers were crammed together, and his drawers jammed with unfolded clothing. He had put away the toys and made the bet, but he had no idea how to make his clothes behave.

 

So, instead of me putting his clothes away or just telling him to fold and put away, I showed him how to fold and organize one of the drawers and stayed close by as he attempted the next drawer. Little by little, he managed to corral all his clothes and all I had to do is look up from my phone when he had questions. 

 

If your child is older and has a smartphone or tablet, you can even install an organization app on it to help them. There are several organizational apps for kids that you can check out and see if one of them will suit your child’s needs. 

3. Teach Kids To Take Mindfulness Breaks

Part of training your child to focus is helping them learn how to be more mindful. Being mindful can help your kid stop their thoughts from scattering and assist them in re-focusing on what they were meant to do. 

There are a couple of ways you can teach mindfulness to your children, such as:

Sensory focusing – You can help your child learn both mindfulness and focus when you use sensory focusing. Have them sit or stand then listen for a particular sound. Maybe you want them to listen for the wind, or sniff the perfume of flowers. Whatever you choose, let it be distinct so your child can focus on that particular sense.

Routine meditation – For older children and teens, having routine meditation can help with focus and mindfulness. Even quietly meditating for 10 minutes a day can be highly beneficial in helping your child calm their mind and focus better. 

4. Break Up Tasks Into Blocks Of Time

Especially for young children who struggle to stay on task, breaking up work into manageable blocks of time can make it easier for them to focus. 

A simple timer can be used to give a visual cue to children that whatever they are working on, it won’t last forever. And, with a clear deadline for their work, children are better able to stay focus to complete their tasks. 

So, whether your child is doing homework or chores, set a short 15-20 minute timer for them. When the timer goes off, give them a short break before getting them back on task, if they have more to do.

This tactic can also help children with depression, as it gives them focused blocks of time where they don’t dwell on their negative emotions and vulnerable to their unhappy thoughts. 

5. Stay Flexible As Your Children Learn To Focus

Learning greater focus will take your child time, and there is no set timeline. Also, not all of the tactics I shared may work for your child, though they have helped not only my children but those of other families. However, each child is unique and takes their own time in learning necessary lifelong skills like focusing. 

 

So, as you work with your kids, stay flexible. See where they may be struggling with focus and concentrate on helping in that area, whether it’s focusing on schoolwork or difficulty with abstract tasks. As you stay flexible, it is less likely you will become frustrated, and with you less frustrated, your child has a higher likelihood of succeeding. 

By teaching your child to learn how to focus on their own, you can help them become self-sufficient and avoid turning yourself into a helicopter parent in an effort to help an unfocused child. 

Child Development: School-age Children Age 5 -11 Years Old

5 Ways To Help Your Teenager Deal With A Breakup

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Christian Parenting: Back to School Guide for Worried Parents https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/school09/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=school09 Fri, 05 Jul 2019 13:46:00 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wordpfam/?p=14282 Families Online Magazine -

Back to School Guide for Worried Parents from the Christian Parenting Corner from Families Online Magazine

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From the Christian Parenting Corner

 

Back to School Guide for Worried Parents
by Sylvia Cochran

 

Are you a worried parent? Are you afraid that your child may suffer from being teased by classmates or fail under the increased pressure of more difficult assignments? If so, you might be tempted to jump into action. Don’t. Here’s why.

The Worried Parent’s Mind

Today’s parents have plenty to worry about. A quick perusal of the evening news shows that there is a good reason for parents to keep a watchful eye on the neighborhood, the child’s acquaintances, and sometimes also the teachers. These are reasonable worries that should express themselves in enhanced supervision, a genuine interest in the child’s friends, and also a well-oiled carpool to get the kids to and from school.

The adverse effects of worried parents come into play when mom and/or dad find they are incapable of allowing junior to experience the sting of failure, the pain of rejection, and sometimes also the consequence of procrastination. If you have ever helped your child with a project (due the next day) and found yourself doing most of the work, but continued to press on, you are a worried parent.

What Makes a Worried Parent Tick?
If you are a worried parent, you might have been on the receiving end of failing grades, belittling by teachers or parents, and you might even remember the pain of being made fun of by your classmates. In turn, you want to spare your child this supposed trauma. Unfortunately, rather than protecting junior from these decidedly unpleasant events, you tell your child – without words – that they are incapable of handling childhood’s basic activities without your input and hands-on help.

Your child will gradually shy back from taking calculated risks, and instead, begin to completely depend on you. This is a dangerous juncture because you are no longer the parent who is protecting a child, but instead, you are allowing your child to feed your most basic desire of being needed. This has all the makings of an unhealthy parent-child relationship.

Why Worried Parents Must Stop Worrying About the Mundane
Do keep worrying about the potential child predator and teach your child street safety. These are bona fide worries every parent should carefully foster. At the same time, lose the worries about your child’s inability to handle failure and smalltime adversity. Remember: in school, the child learns not only to succeed, but also to fail and how to deal with bad grades, unpleasant classmates, and blatantly biased teachers. Make sure your child knows that you are always there with an open ear and advice – if asked.

While in early elementary school you still need to actively guide your child on how to deal with a bad grade and what lessons to derive from the schoolyard problems; toward the end of elementary school, the child should have a good understanding that bad grades require more serious studying and that the schoolyard politics may be avoided easily by choosing her/his friends wisely.

What Happens if Parents Keep on Worrying?
If you insist on worrying about your child’s inability to handle simple conflict and failure, you will end up with a child who becomes afraid of everything. Over time, your child expects you to take care of virtually all aspects of her/his life. S/He becomes incapable of taking responsibility unless told specifically what to do. This leads to a negative self-image and of course an underlying ingratitude to you, the parent, who is going to be blamed for whatever might be going wrong in the child’s life.

What Does the Bible Say About Worried Parents?
James 1:2-5 reminds worriers that adversity and trouble are great ways of growing, building endurance, and eventually developing a strong character that is ready to handle whatever life throws at it.

So, when the school project is due tomorrow, offer your help; as soon as junior stops working, so do you. Lend a help with specific tasks under your child’s supervision, but do not take over the project. If this means a bad grade but a great learning experience with respect to procrastination and good study habits, is this not a lesson well learned for a relatively small price tag?

For more help with this topic, please check out the writer’s book review of “Parenting with Love and Logic.”

More Christian Parenting Resources:

Christianity Today

Catholic Parenting

 

Christian Parenting: Parenting like King Hezekiah? It’s not too late to Wise Up!

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10 Ways to Cure the Back to School Blues https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/school-blues/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=school-blues Fri, 05 Jul 2019 07:21:00 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wordpfam/?p=13862 Families Online Magazine -

10 Ways to Cure the Back to School Blues -- Real Advice for Real Life from the American Nanny Families Online Magazine.

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Real Advice For Real Life

Parenting Expert Advice from Author and America’s Nanny,

Michelle LaRowe

10 Ways to Cure the Back to School Blues

“I don’t want to go to school today.”

“I’m sick.”

“I’m tired. “Sound familiar?

With school in full swing, you’re not alone. Many families have kids that are experiencing the back to school blues. If your child is struggling with getting back into the swing of things this season, try out these tips.

1. Send your kids off to school with a super nutritional breakfast. Turkey sausage and eggs and cheese, or fresh fruit, yogurt and a handful of nuts are protein packed choices that will energize and jump-start your child’s day. Not to mention home cookin’ will always rouse the troops.

2. Get things ready to go the night before. Making it as easy as possible for your child to get out of the door will eliminate potential pitfalls. Pull out clothes and pack lunches in the evening. Gather shoes and backpacks and put them by the door.

3. Leave love notes in the lunch box. Make your child smile halfway through the day by dropping a note into his backpack or lunchbox. Let him know that you miss him and can’t wait for him to get home.

4. Make coming home fun. Have a tasty treat waiting for your child when she returns home from school. Homemade cookies are sure to make any child smile.

5. Arrange for playdates and outings. Help your child build relationships with classmates by providing an opportunity for play. Nature walks or trips to the local playground make for wonderful fall after-school adventures.

6. Do dinner together. Gathering around the family table provides a great opportunity for everyone to reconnect after an otherwise disjointed day. Give everyone a chance to talk about their day by asking open-ended questions, like “What was your favorite part of school today.”

7. Get involved. Have a presence at your child’s school by volunteering in the classroom or library or by joining the PTA. Parents who are active in their child’s academic life tend to be more excited about going to school.

8. Take a break. Make weekends enjoyable and something that your child looks forward to. Spend time together as a family. Take a walk, play a game or go on a family outing.

9. Have consequences for uncooperative behavior. If your child gives you trouble getting out of bed in the morning, for each time that you have to go into his room to ask him to get up, push his bedtime up by 15 minutes.

10. Catch him being good. Praise your child when he makes an effort to get out the door on time, has a positive attitude or does his homework without your nagging.

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6 Signs Your Teen Is Going Through Depression https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/signs-teen-depression/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=signs-teen-depression Sun, 09 Jun 2019 19:37:03 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=22124 Families Online Magazine -

By tyler Jacobson The transition from childhood and adulthood can be tough for teens. Nowadays teens struggle with various issues both at school and in the home, causing more stress, […]

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teen depression

By tyler Jacobson

The transition from childhood and adulthood can be tough for teens. Nowadays teens struggle with various issues both at school and in the home, causing more stress, anxiety, and depression than ever before.

As a parent, you might wonder if the changes you see in your teen are normal or something to worry about. How can you know if your teen is depressed?

Here are 6 signs to watch out for:

 

  • Sudden drastic changes in behavior.

 

If your usually conscientious teen suddenly starts abusing drugs or alcohol, becomes promiscuous or starts getting into trouble at school, it might be a sign of something deeper going on. Your teen could be acting out in a bid to counter the sadness or numbness that usually accompanies depression. It could also be their way of crying out for help.

 

  • Irritability, anger, and hostility.

 

Being a teen in today’s world isn’t easy. They have to deal with pressures from their parents, peers, and school all while coping with the havoc brought about by hormones. All this can make anyone have a short fuse. However, be on alert if your teen’s mood suddenly changes and they become agitated, easily frustrated, prone to angry outbursts and generally hostile.

 

  • Deep sadness and talk of suicide or death.

 

Perhaps the most alarming and obvious sign that all’s not well with your teen is a sudden fascination with suicide or death. Depression often tricks the victim into thinking that no one cares about them and that life is worthless. Your teen then plunges into deep sadness and eventually, death seems like the only way out of their misery. Suicidal ideation accompanied by a sense of hopelessness and apathy should be taken seriously as it could indicate that your teen is sinking fast and needs help right away.

 

  • Changes in eating habits and weight.

 

Another sign of depression could be an insatiable or decreased appetite. Your teen could try to eat their depression away (gaining weight in the process) or they might lose their appetite altogether, which would lead to weight loss.

 

  • Changes in sleeping patterns.

 

Depression often comes with feelings of intense fatigue and exhaustion, making it tough to do even the smallest tasks. Due to this, your teen could start sleeping more than usual. Conversely, they may exhibit insomnia and have trouble falling and staying asleep throughout the night.

 

  • Withdrawal from friends and family.

 

Social withdrawal could be another indicator of depression. Your once outgoing teen might suddenly start isolating themselves from their friends and family, preferring to spend more time on their own. They might also lose interest in activities they once enjoyed and might opt out of participating in any social activities with their family or peers.

Get Help For Your Teen

If you notice your teen showing any of these signs, talk to them and try to find out what’s going on. In case you feel that they’re not being completely honest, try talking with their friends. Trust your gut if you feel that your teen is going through depression, be supportive and get them help from a qualified therapist. Sometimes teens might need to spend time at a therapeutic boarding school to help them get their lives back on track.

Depression might seem overwhelming to you and your teen but be assured that with the right help and lots of love and support from you, your teen can get better.

5 Major Consequences of Being A Helicopter Parent

Parenting: How to Save and Make Money as a Teen

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5 Ways To Help Your Teenager Deal With A Breakup https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/help-teenager-breakup/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=help-teenager-breakup Sun, 09 Jun 2019 19:31:25 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=22121 Families Online Magazine -

By Tyler Jacobson Teen romances can be intense, short-lived experiences. One minute your teen is soaring on the wings of love, the next they’re crashing back to earth. Whether it went […]

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teen sad over breakup

By Tyler Jacobson

Teen romances can be intense, short-lived experiences. One minute your teen is soaring on the wings of love, the next they’re crashing back to earth.

Whether it went on for a few months or ended after some weeks, the end of a relationship can be brutal for a teenager who’s just started learning how to deal with their emotions. There will be tears, moping, hunger strikes and blasting of angry music.

While all this might be a little hard to take, it presents an opportunity to teach your teen how to handle pain, disappointment, and rejection and how to forgive and move on with their lives. Handled correctly, your teen might emerge as a wiser, more resilient person.

They will need lots of help from you though. Here’s what you can do:

Validate their emotions.

Invalidating your teen’s feelings by saying things like ‘teen romances don’t work out’ will just make them feel worse. Instead, try validating their feelings. Statements like ‘I know how sad this is…’ express empathy and understanding and are a much more positive way of dealing with breakups.

Be a good listener.

After a breakup, teens experience a whirlwind of emotions. Help yours sort through them by being a good listener and providing a shoulder to cry on. Give them space to vent, talk and cry. Encourage them to open up to you but don’t nag them if they choose not to.

Find the middle ground.

As a parent, you have the benefit of hindsight so you know that things will get better. Unfortunately, your teen doesn’t know this so it’s up to you to inspire hope for the future. At the same time, encourage them to express and work through their feelings rather than bottling them up.

Encourage a return to their daily routine.

After your teen has wallowed in self-pity, anger, and disappointment for a few days, start ushering them to resume their daily routine. The everyday normalcy of chores, homework, family and co-curricular activities can provide a much-needed balm to soothe an aching heart. If nothing else, it will distract them from their problems, reminding them that life does go on, with or without a boyfriend or girlfriend.

Seek further help when necessary.

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, your teen might not open up to you. Other times, the moping and mourning period might stretch on longer than expected. If your teen is having trouble getting over the breakup and they’re withdrawn or showing other signs of depression, it’s time to seek professional help.

Helping a teen through a breakup calls for a great deal of patience and understanding. Over time, they’ll eventually get over it and be thankful for your help.

Career Quiz for Teens

Ways to Help Your Teens Cope with Anxiety

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Childproofing Your Backyard — Real Advice for Real Life from the American Nanny https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/childproof-backyard/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=childproof-backyard Tue, 14 May 2019 03:21:02 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wordpfam/?p=13833 Families Online Magazine -

Childproofing Your Backyard -- Real Advice for Real Life from the American Nanny Families Online Magazine.

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Real Advice For Real Life

Parenting Expert Advice from Author and America’s Nanny,

Michelle LaRowe

family in backyard by fenceChildproofing Your Backyard

The warmer weather is coming, and you’ll soon be preparing to transform your backyard into a summer playground. To keep the kids safe, follow these childproofing guidelines to cut back on the hidden hazards in your backyard and to make your summer play zone a safe place to be.

Carefully inspect your playground equipment. According to the National Program for Playground Safety over 200,000 children per year are injured on playgrounds. Since most of these injuries are a result of falls, be sure that you have a proper shock absorbing surface underneath your play set. 12 inches of sand, mulch or rubber matting will offer your kids the best protection.

You’ll also want to be sure that your play set is properly anchored to the ground, that surfaces are smooth, that protruding bolts are repaired and that all “S shaped hooks are fully closed. Check your slide for any sharp edges and be sure that there is a clear exit area for sliders.

Think twice about trampolines.

If the nearly 250,000 trampoline injuries reported each year (according to the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons) has not convinced you to steer clear of this backyard accessory, if you opt to purchase a trampoline for your kids, be sure it is a spring-less model that has a full safety enclosure. Since a majority of trampoline injuries occur from children colliding with other jumpers, it’s vitally important to continuously supervise your kids at play.

Sandbox safety.

If your sandbox is built directly on the ground, be sure to line it with landscape fabric to prevent weeds from growing up and to facilitate water drainage. You’ll also want to fill your sandbox with “sandbox sand. Sold at home improvement stores, sandbox sand is smoother and cleaner than regular sand. You’ll also need to invest in a cover to keep pets and rodents (and their droppings!) out. Place a 5 gallon bucket upside down in your sandbox and properly secure a plastic tarp onto the sandbox. The bucket will prevent water from pooling on the top of the tarp which can be a safety issue for your kids and a breeding ground for bugs.

Landscape Supplies and Equipment.

Your kids are naturally curious and won’t hesitate to explore. Be sure all power equipment and lawn treatment products are stored and secured in a locked shed.

Decks.

Be sure to measure the space between the railing slots on your deck. If they are wide enough for your kids to trap a limb, utilize safety netting. You’ll also want to be sure a hard mounted gate is attached to the top and bottom of the stairs.

Pools.

Be sure your pool is properly barricaded. Install a fence that is at least 4 feet tall and be sure that there are no weak areas that your kids can squeeze through. Be sure the gate has a self-locking mechanism that your kids can’t open. You may also want to invest in a gate or pool alarm that will alert you if the gate has been opened or if someone falls into the pool. Remove steps and ladders when the pool isn’t in use (and keep step stools and ladders away from all fences). Never leave the cover halfway on your pool, as your child could swim under and become stuck. If your patio door leads directly to the pool, lock and alarm it. Inflatable pools should be drained, deflated and stored and secured when not in use.

Check fences.

Check your fence for loose hardware, splinters and missing slats. Be sure pickets are less than 5 inches apart and that there are no sharp edges for your kids to get caught on.

Outdoor furniture.

Be sure your outdoor seating is sturdy and safe. Secure garden swings properly to the ground and check to ensure cushions are securely fastened to seating.

Koi Ponds.

Fish ponds pose a special backyard hazard for children as their shallow depth can give parents, children and caregivers a false sense of security. Be sure pools of water of any depth are properly barricaded to prevent unauthorized access.

Outdoor Outlets.

Replace outdoor outlets with childproof outlets that your kids can’t open.

BBQ’s and Grills.

When not in use, store and secure grilling equipment. Propane tanks, matches, lighter fluid and sharp cooking utensils should all be inaccessible to your kids. When in use, never leave the cooking area unsupervised and be sure that the unit it cooled completely before storing away.

Clothing.

Require your kids to wear proper footwear and snug fit clothing when playing outdoors. Avoid articles of clothing with drawstrings or accessories that can easily become caught on play equipment.

Establish Clear Boundaries and Rules.

Having a list of backyard rules can help guide your kids in safe play. Establish any areas that are off limits, rules for riders on slides, trampolines and other play toys and safety guidelines for using play equipment.While childproofing your backyard can help eliminate common safety hazards and create a safer environment for your children to play in, even the best safety measures do not substitute for parental supervision.


More Parenting Advice:

http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Parents-Young.shtml

http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Parents-Teens.shtml

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/parenting.html 

https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/evacuate/

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5 Major Consequences of Being A Helicopter Parent https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/helicopter-parent/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=helicopter-parent Thu, 09 May 2019 15:15:04 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=22062 Families Online Magazine -

We all know a helicopter parent or two. Perhaps we are helicopter parents ourselves. Either way, it’s a parenting style that has gained prominence and attracted ridicule and attention in […]

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We all know a helicopter parent or two. Perhaps we are helicopter parents ourselves. Either way, it’s a parenting style that has gained prominence and attracted ridicule and attention in equal measure.

If you ask them, helicopter parents will claim that they’re only looking out for their kids’ best interests—and they are. The only problem is that they’re going about it the wrong way.

The thought of seeing their children struggling, getting hurt or disappointed is often too much to bear. So their blades start spinning, and they hover around their kids’ lives clearing their path, getting rid of any obstacles and making tough decisions on their behalf. They even go so far as to rescue their kids and teens from the consequences of their bad decisions, never allowing their teens to learn to cope with their choices.

What many don’t realize is that helicopter parenting is actually destructive. It hurts more than it helps.

Here are some results from being a helicopter parent:

Teens don’t learn to make good choices for themselves.

With all the risk factors facing teens in the US, it’s understandable why some parents want to shield their kids from the harsh realities of life. However, constantly swooping in to save teens from the consequences of their bad decisions don’t help. It only encourages them to remain dependent on their parents to sort out problems on their behalf.

It compromises the kid’s autonomy and personal growth.

Parents are charged with helping their kids acquire enough knowledge and skills to become independent adults. Helicopter parenting does the opposite and curtails a teen’s personal growth. To become self-reliant adults, teens are meant to take risks and make mistakes—that’s how they learn what works and what doesn’t.

Teens develop poor coping skills.

Clearing all obstacles from your teen’s life might seem like a good thing. Unfortunately, it means that your teen won’t develop the necessary coping skills and resilience to cope with challenges that they’ll undoubtedly encounter in life. This results in teens who are predisposed to increased anxiety, frustration, and stress.

It undermines their self-confidence.

Taking over tasks and doing every little thing for your teen sends a subconscious message that you don’t have faith in their abilities. They internalize this, and their self-confidence takes a hit. Helicopter parenting results in teens who doubt their own skills, competence and their ability to successfully make their own way in the world.

It puts the parent-teen relationship at risk.

As teen’s search for autonomy, some fight their parents’ helicopter parenting style. They find it intrusive, suffocating and even humiliating. As a result, they might either get angry and start acting out, or they withdraw from their parents. None of these bodes well for the parent-teen relationship, both in the present and in the future, when the teen becomes an adult.

It’s hard for parents to sit by and watch their kids and teens floundering, making mistakes and getting hurt or disappointed. But, instead of stepping in to solve problems for them, a better way would be to provide guidance and support to help them overcome challenges and obstacles on their own.

Ways to Help Your Teens Cope with Anxiety

3 Things Social Media Is Teaching Teens And What We Can Do About It

3 Ways Family Dinner Helps Teens

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Helping the Disabled Child through Spring’s Rebirth https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/spring-2-3/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=spring-2-3 Wed, 08 May 2019 04:34:02 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wordpfam/spring-2/ Families Online Magazine -

Special Need Children: Helping the Child with Special Needs through Spring's Rebirth from Families Online Magazine.

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special need child

Exceptional Families with Exceptional Kids

by Christopher Auer

Helping the Disabled Child Spring’s Rebirth

Now that winter is officially over, I can look back with some relief that I drive a four wheel drive. It seemed as though every weekend it snowed. Not just a little, a lot! While my children loved to play in the mounds of snow at first, eventually cabin fever set in, especially for my son who is diagnosed with ADHD and sensory processing disorder.

Now that we’ve had weather befitting the start of spring, I have come to appreciate the importance of nature for children in general, but especially for children with special needs, including children with ADHD, cognitive delays, autism and any of the other myriad of disorders. I’m amazed at how calm children are when they’ve had a chance to go on a hike, or play outside in the yard for a few hours. It’s the best free medicine I know.

I’ve also come to appreciate the gift of animals. My wife and I have been talking about getting a horse for several years. Many of her relatives either own a ranch, or work on a ranch. Last weekend, we went to a Horse Expo to ‘look’, though secretly hoping that the other would make the first move towards ownership.

As we walked the stalls, we came across a quarter-horse by the name of Jeffrey. To make a long story short, we rode him, wrote a hot check, frantically searched for a place to put Jeffrey (hotels don’t leave their light on for horses), found a place, deposited ‘funny money’ to cover the check, realized that we didn’t have a saddle or any means of riding, and finally asked for help from someone who knew about horses.

I’m proud to say that we’ve been to the barn every night since acquiring our new family member. I now understand how useful animals can be for therapy. My wife is certified to do hippo therapy (occupational therapy on a horse), and has worked with our children on Jeffrey. Even in only a week, the results are impressive. All of my children, especially my child with special needs, are better able to focus, follow directions, more patient, and just better able to cope with life. I’m not sure how much of this is due to being outside all evening, or actually riding Jeffrey.

Regardless, it’s clear to me how deprived many of our children are from natural living. While it may seem that television is calming for our children, the best therapy is probably in your own backyard, or at the park. It’s being outside, enjoying the sounds, sights and smells of our planet and the company of other living creatures.

This spring, I hope that you and your family spend many, many lazy hours enjoying our amazing planet and renewing your spirit. There is so much to look forward to in the months ahead. I can’t wait to barbecue corn on the cob, and anything else that will work on a barbecue – especially since it cuts down on the amount of dishes I need to wash.

Look for Chris’ New Book –

special need child
Parenting a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder: A Family Guide to Understanding and Supporting Your Sensory-Sensitive Child

Parenting a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder: A Family Guide to Understanding and Supporting Your Sensory-Sensitive Child (Christopher Auer, MA with Susan L.Blumberg, Ph.D., New Harbinger Publications, December 2006) www.newharbinger.com

 

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What Parents Can do to Keep Graduation Parties Fun and Safe https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/graduation-party-safe/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=graduation-party-safe Thu, 11 Apr 2019 14:38:53 +0000 https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/?p=12809 Families Online Magazine -

Graduation is a time to celebrate. But before your high school seniors begin their graduation parties, take the time to talk with them about keeping events alcohol-free—it just may save […]

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graduation classGraduation is a time to celebrate. But before your high school seniors begin their graduation parties, take the time to talk with them about keeping events alcohol-free—it just may save a life.

No amount of underage drinking is legal or safe. And we know that any underage drinking can lead to consuming too much alcohol, which may result in poor decisions, injuries, alcohol overdose, and possibly death.

Teen Brains Still Developing

A teenager’s brain is still developing, and it is very sensitive to alcohol’s effects on judgment and decision-making. Tragedies can—and do—happen, so underage drinking should not be a part of any end-of-year celebration. More about Teen Brain Development

The Effects of Alcohol Can Be Deceptive

If you are asked to explain the reasons behind your rules, you can describe the effects of alcohol on the human body:

When people drink alcohol, they may temporarily feel elated and happy, but they should not be fooled. As blood alcohol level rises, the effects on the body—and the potential risks—multiply. Inhibitions and memory become affected, so people may say and do things that they will regret later and possibly not remember doing at all.

  • Decision-making skills are affected, so people may be at greater risk for driving under the influence—and risking an alcohol-related traffic crash—or making unwise decisions about sex.
  • Aggression can increase, potentially leading to everything from verbal abuse to physical fights.
  • Coordination and physical control are also impacted. When drinking leads to loss of balance, slurred speech, and blurred vision, even normal activities can become more dangerous.
  • Consumption of a dangerously high amount of alcohol can also lead to alcohol overdose and death.
  • Vulnerability to overdose increases if the teen is already on a sedative-hypnotic or pain medication. When people drink too much, they may eventually pass out (lose consciousness). Reflexes like gagging and breathing can be suppressed. That means people who have had too much alcohol could vomit and choke, or just stop breathing completely.

Consequences More Than a Hangover

Drinking to celebrate graduation can result in vandalism, arrests, sexual assaults, injuries and trips to the emergency room, alcohol-related traffic crashes, and worse. Drinking by teens can put them—and their friends—in real danger. Ask them to consider this question: Is that any way to celebrate?

What Can a Parent Do?

It is critical to talk with your graduate because research shows that parents do make a difference.

  • Serve as a positive role model
  • Talk with other parents and your teens
  • Supervise parties to make sure no alcohol is served
  • Support alcohol-free school celebrations

You can help prevent a life-changing mistake.

A Word About Alcohol Overdose
Thousands of students are transported to the emergency room each year for alcohol overdose, which occurs when high levels of alcohol suppress the nervous and respiratory systems.

Signs of Alcohol Overdose Can Include:

  • Slow or irregular breathing;
  • Vomiting;
  • Mental confusion, stupor, loss of consciousness, or coma; and
  • Hypothermia or low body temperature, bluish or pale skin.

An alcohol overdose can lead to permanent brain damage or death, so a person showing any of these signs requires immediate medical attention. If you or your graduate notices any of these signs, don’t wait. Call 911 if you suspect an alcohol overdose.

Tell your graduate to play it safe and party right—and alcohol-free—at graduation. Because a well-deserved celebration shouldn’t end in tragedy.

More Information: https://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov 

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