tween textingParents report  that the way they handle the challenge of digital parenting includes:

  • 12-13 years old is the average age when children establish social media accounts which coincides with the age most teens get their first smartphone
  • Almost 62% of parents use phones to call and keep track of their child’s whereabouts
  • 50% of parents don’t negotiate a smartphone contract with their children
  • 85% of parents know how to unlock their child’s phone, but only 60% know their child’s social media passwords
  • 59% of parents check their child’s phone manually either daily or weekly, 36% check it weekly, 16% monthly, 20% rarely and less than 3% never check
  • Only 26% of parents are aware of alternate social media accounts their child uses as a decoy to their “real” profile, but experts believe that most teens have decoy accounts

“Parents need to be proactive in finding these fake accounts,” says TeenSafe CEO Ralph Acosta. “Many teens have more than two or three public-facing social media accounts and a ‘Finsta’ or fake account where they post without inhibition thinking it will stay private.

The danger is that it doesn’t stay private. This study shows that there are many other steps parents can take to become digital-safety savvy including ongoing digital literacy, talking continuously as a family and protective monitoring.”

A new CDC ( Center for Disease Control) resource for educators and parents offers the following cyber safety ‘tweensstrategies:

 1. Talk to your child. Parents ask their children where they are going and who they are going with whenever they leave the house. They should take the same approach when their children go on the Internet—where are they going and who are they with?

2. Develop rules. Together with your child, develop rules about acceptable and safe behaviors for all electronic media.

3. Explore the Internet. Visit the websites your child frequents, and assess the pros and cons. Most websites and on-line activities are beneficial. They help young people learn new information and interact with people who have similar interests.

4. Talk with others. Talk to other parents about how they have discussed technology use with their children.

5. Connect with the school . Parents are encouraged to work with their child’s school and school dist rict to develop a class for parents that educates about school policies on electronic aggression and resources available to parents.

6. Educate yourself. Stay informed about the new devices and websites your child is using. Continually talk with your child and explore the technology yourself.

Sources: TeenSafe and the CDC

Saying “No” and Keeping Friends, Peer Pressure Part 1

https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/internet-safety/
Greta Jenkins

Greta Jenkins

Greta Jenkins is an author, mom, nurse and a community volunteer. She is the author of various articles about home and family life and has been featured in various parenting magazines and newspapers.
Greta Jenkins

Latest posts by Greta Jenkins (see all)

https://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2017/08/tweens.jpghttps://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2017/08/tweens-150x145.jpgGreta JenkinsParenting AdviceFamily Safety Tips,Parenting TeensParents report  that the way they handle the challenge of digital parenting includes:12-13 years old is the average age when children establish social media accounts which coincides with the age most teens get their first smartphone Almost 62% of parents use phones to call and keep track of...Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids