Dogs and Puppies: Preventing Accidents

Accidents can be prevented by thinking ahead and avoiding dangerous situations. Automobiles are the number one killer of dogs, so keep him leashed, or fenced in at all times. Invisible fencing is a popular alternative to traditional fencing styles.

Keep poisons out of reach. Many household plants are toxic to dogs, including poinsettias, ferns, philodendrons, dieffenbachia, and other varieties. Cleaning solutions such as detergents, bleaches, oven cleaners, etc. may pose hazards as well. Make sure bottle caps are tight and the rags used to apply these chemicals are stored safely out of reach. Treat animals like children and keep medicines locked up, and never leave candy, especially chocolate, where dogs may have access to it.

Outdoor hazards include windshield cleaners, antifreeze, weed killers, used motor oil and insecticides. Antifreeze has a sweet taste, and just a few drops can be fatal to your dog. Other hazards include rodenticides used to kill rats and mice. If any poisoning occurs, call your veterinarian immediately, and provide a sample of the poison with the labeling to aid in proper treatment. In an emergency, call the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center at 800-548-2423.

Keep sharp objects, i.e., knives and forks, carpet tacks, paper clips, etc., out of reach, in addition to children’s toys or small objects which may become lodged in a dog’s throat. Never leave a dog unattended on a balcony. A precocious pet may squeeze through the bars and fall, which could fatally injure him.

Avoid extremes in temperature. Of course, never leave a dog in a parked car in hot weather, even with the windows open, and never leave him outside without water and shade. Similarly, in frigid temperatures, bring him indoors, and be sure he always has shelter from wind, rain, and sun, even in mild temperatures.

OLD AGE

Dogs are considered “old” around eight or nine years, but many live into their mid-teens, with proper care and nutrition. Senior citizens have more needs, and require more attention. Their sight and hearing may diminish, and they will sleep more and move more slowly. Steps may become a hardship, so sleeping arrangements may need adjusting. They need to go out more often, as bladder control is usually weakened. They still need moderate exercise, frequent grooming, and appropriate nutrition. Since they may have fewer teeth, a soft diet may be necessary. It is especially important to avoid obesity, since it will affect your pet’s quality of life. More frequent veterinary visits may be required to deal with tumors, arthritis, or heart disease. Some dogs require daily medications to treat the infirmities of old age. Together you and your veterinarian can have a positive influence on your dogs happiness and comfort for many years to come. The rewards of dog ownership will last a lifetime.

 

Marilyn Clinton

Marilyn Clinton

Mary is a single parent and writer. She likes to share her family adventures, and tips for managing a busy family and a full-time job.
Marilyn Clinton

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Marilyn ClintonPetsPetsDogs and Puppies: Preventing Accidents Accidents can be prevented by thinking ahead and avoiding dangerous situations. Automobiles are the number one killer of dogs, so keep him leashed, or fenced in at all times. Invisible fencing is a popular alternative to traditional fencing styles. Keep poisons out of reach. Many household...Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids