baby parentingchild development

Child Development Guide for 3-6 Months

newbornBabies develop at their own pace, so it’s impossible to tell exactly when your child will learn a given skill. The developmental steps listed below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect, but don’t be alarmed if your own baby’s development is not exaclty as listed.

Social and Emotional

  • Begins to display a social smile
  • Enjoys playing with others and may cry when playing stops
  • Expressive and communicates more with face and body
  • Imitates some movements and facial expressions

Movement

  • Raises head and chest when lying on stomach
  • Supports upper body with arms when lying on stomach
  • Stretches legs out and kicks when lying on stomach or back
  • Opens and closes hands
  • Pushes down on legs when feet are placed on a firm surface
  • Brings hand to mouth
  • Takes swipes at dangling objects with hands
  • Grasps and shakes hand toys

Vision

  • Watches faces closely
  • Follows moving objects
  • Recognizes familiar objects and people at a distance
  • Starts using hands and eyes in coordination

Hearing and Speech

  • Smiles at the sound of your voice
  • Begins to babble
  • Begins to imitate some sounds
  • Turns head toward sound

Developmental Health Watch

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any
of the following signs of possible developmental delay for
this age range.

  • Does not seem to respond to loud noises
  • Does not notice hands by 2 months
  • Does not follow moving objects with eyes by 2 to 3 months
  • Does not grasp and hold objects by 3 months
  • Does not smile at people by 3 months
  • Cannot support head well by 3 months
  • Does not reach for and grasp toys by 3 to 4 months
  • Does not babble by 3 to 4 months
  • Does not bring objects to mouth by 4 months
  • Begins babbling, but does not try to imitate any of your sounds by 4 months
  • Does not push down with legs when feet are placed on a firm surface by 4 months
  • Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions
  • Crosses eyes most of the time (occasional crossing of the eyes is normal in these first months)
  • Does not pay attention to new faces, or seems very frightened by new faces or surroundings

Source:Center for Disease Control

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Maggie Manion

Margie Manion graduated from Northwest Missouri State University with a double major in Elementary Education and Early Childhood Development. She taught for several years. Then went on to marry her college sweetheart. They have two beautiful boys who are the the center of their world. Margie taught in the classroom for 4 years until she quit to stay home with her two boys. During this time, as a parent educator with the Parents As Teachers program ashe did a local parenting segment, weekly, with WDAF Fox 4 in Kansas City. She is currently a frequest guest on FNC and is back in the classroom teaching 3rd grade in Liberty, MO, as well as promoting her invention and book (Zoom Spoon and "Zoom Spoon and Finicky Philip the Picky Eater" .

Margie wants you to know that, "I am very passionate about what I do. I know that parenting is the hardest and most important job in the world! I would like to reach as many parents as possible to help them to take extra steps to make their parenting experience a positive one! There is no such thing as the "perfect parent" it is an ongoing process and it is never to late to try something new!"
https://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2014/03/wnewborninhands.jpghttps://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2014/03/wnewborninhands-150x150.jpgMaggie ManionAges and StagesBaby Care and DevelopmentAges and Stages,Emotional and Social Well-being,ParentingChild Development Guide for 3-6 Months Babies develop at their own pace, so it's impossible to tell exactly when your child will learn a given skill. The developmental steps listed below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect, but don’t be alarmed if your own baby's development is not...Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids