By Doctor Seibel – HouseCall®

Almost everyone knows someone who has had a medical emergency: a broken bone, a burn, choking, a bee sting, a stroke. The list goes on and on. But for most people, the hope is that it will never happen to them. That’s why so many people don’t give it a lot of thought and aren’t prepared for a medical emergency.

If that sounds like you, here are three important questions you should be asking:

Would I recognize a medical emergency?

Would I know when to call 9-1-1?

What should I do after I call 9-1-1?

Not knowing the answers to these three important questions is one of the main reasons people die in a medical emergency even though their death could be preventable. Unfortunately, 40% of Americans don’t know a single symptom of a stroke even though it’s the third most common cause of death in the United States.

That’s why I, together with Shelly Glazier, have written a new book called “Save Your Life: What To Do In A Medical Emergency.” It’s a simple to read and easy to understand guide that answers the three important questions above.

Here are four important examples taken from our “Save Your Life” book to help you when you are faced with a medical emergency.

If you think there could be a medical emergency:

Should you:

  • Call your doctor?

No!Waiting for the doctor to call back wastes valuable time.

  • Rest to see if you feel better?

No! Waiting to see if the symptoms pass also wastes time that could save a life because the sooner you get medical care: the more likely you are to live.

  • Drive yourself to the hospital?

If you drive yourself to the hospital, you might pass out or stop breathing on the way.

  • Call a family member or friend for a ride to the hospital?

No! Do not ask family or friends to drive you to the hospital (unless emergency services are not available). If you lose consciousness, your driver likely won’t be able to help you.

Here is why you should call 9-1-1 immediately whenever you think it’s an emergency:

When you call 9-1-1, the responding Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) will monitor you. If you stop breathing or your heart stops beating, they will give you emergency treatment on the way to the hospital.

They also will notify the emergency room staffs of your condition, so when you arrive they will know you need immediate treatment.

 

Here is why you should call 9-1-1 immediately whenever you think it’s an emergency:

  • When you call 9-1-1, the responding Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) will monitor you. If you stop breathing or your heart stops beating, they will give you emergency treatment on the way to the hospital.
  • They also will notify the emergency room staffs of your condition, so when you arrive they will know you need immediate treatment.
  • Calling 9-1-1 is the safest and fastest way to get medical care. Remember, car accidents are more likely to happen when family or friends are trying to rush you to the hospital. 

People Often Ask,

I’ve had many symptoms at one time or another that I worried could be an emergency. How will I know when to call 9-1-1?

The Answer Is,

Everyone knows how his or her own body normally feels. When your body starts to feel very unusual or strange, don’t try to diagnose the symptoms on your own. Call 9-1-1 immediately. For example, if you experience a sudden onset of extreme fatigue, or any other symptoms that you’ve never felt before, don’t ignore it. Call 9-1-1. It could be a heart attack.

Make the right call. If it could be life threatening or you’re not sure, don’t guess,call 9-1-1!

Earlier in this article I mentioned that only 40% of Americans know even one symptom of a stroke. Just in case you are one of them, here is what you need to remember to save someone’s life from a stroke. Remember the first letters; they spell the word FAST

Common Symptoms of Stroke The National Stroke Association’s “ACT FAST©” list can help you identify the symptoms of a stroke:

FACE  – Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

ARMS  – Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift

SPEECH –  Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Ask them to repeat a phrase. Are the words slurred or strange?

TIME – If the person shows any of these symptoms, time is important because brain cells die every second.

If the person shows any of these symptoms, time is important because brain cells die every second.

For more information about “Save Your Life: What To Do In A Medical Emergency” go to www.DoctorSeibel.com or to purchase the book go to Amazon.com (https://amzn.to/oE56BZ)

 

 

 

Machelle  Seibel, MD

 

It is a real pleasure to contribute a regular article to Families Online Magazine. Over the past 30 years I’ve had the privilege of providing care to over 10,000 women. I’ve helped them face their challenges, answered their questions, and heard the frustrations they deal with as they transition from their reproductive years to and through menopause.

As a result, my goal is to share the wisdom I’ve gained that applies directly to women’s health and menopause, or provide insights that can be of help with their families. Some articles will be on things that are ongoing health and wellness topics, and others will be comments or perspectives on important issues you notice in the news.

You will find my two most recent books helpful. They are Eat to Defeat Menopause and Save Your Life: What to do in a Medical Emergency. Click their titles now to learn more.

My websites are https://www.doctorseibel.com/ & https://www.healthrockwomen.com/. There are many FREE downloads, songs, videos, eBooks and other useful content that I hope will help you stay well. My comments here aren’t intended to take the place of your healthcare provider. If you have a medical problem, be sure to ask your doctor.

If you have a topic you want me to cover, drop me a note at [email protected] and I’ll do my best to cover it for you. Receive my content-rich FREE NEWSLETTER at www.DoctorSeibel.com.

 

 

Editor’s Note: Do not consider medical editorial reviews, news items and other general information found in any Families Online Magazine medical or natural health columns as a prescription, medical advice or an endorsement for any treatment or procedure. Always seek any medical advice from your doctor. Medical editorial reviews and other news items that you read about may or may not be appropriate for your particular health problem or concern. Always refer these matters to your physician for clarification and determination. Any information provided in may be controversial, totally unrelated to your own situation, even harmful if taken merely at face value without appropriate evaluation of your specific condition, and therefore must be considered simply to be an editorial review, a news review or a general medical information review and not as relating to your specific condition or as information for diagnosis, evaluation or treatment of your specific condition.

 

 

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Families Online MagazineHouseCall® Medical Advice ColumnBy Doctor Seibel - HouseCall® Almost everyone knows someone who has had a medical emergency: a broken bone, a burn, choking, a bee sting, a stroke. The list goes on and on. But for most people, the hope is that it will never happen to them. That's...Parenting Support | Family Fun Activities for Kids