By Sonya Weiss

For Interior Decorating

Not seeing the potential in a piece of furniture can lead to regrets. I’m usually pretty good at looking past the current condition of any item and picturing it as it could be. But I made a mistake recently that I really regret. I had an old kitchen bench style chair that went with a trestle style bench. I’d had the chair for years and loved it. It had a heart cut out at the back and was handcrafted from dark oak.

Wood Furniture’s Potential

Because the wood had cracked on the back of the chair, I set it out in the garage until I decided what to do with it and I forgot about it. Then as I was cleaning out the garage, I briefly looked at the chair, decided it didn’t have any potential and placed the chair by the curb for garbage pickup.

A few minutes later, a neighbor stopped and asked if she could have it. I told her she could and went back to cleaning out the garage. Several weeks later, that bench chair showed up on my neighbor’s porch. It had been repaired, sanded painted whiteand was a beautiful addition to their porch where they could sit on warm spring nights.

Now every time I drive out of the neighborhood, I see that bench chair and I’m reminded of what I could have done with that myself. The biggest kick is that I’ve been looking for a seat for my own porch! So I learned a valuable lesson-never overlook the possibilities of what could be rather than what is.

Sharon Scott

Sharon Scott

Sharon is the author of eight award-winning books including four on the topic of peer to peer pressure.

The guide for parents/educators on how to peer-proof children and teens is Peer Pressure Reversal: An Adult Guide to Developing a Responsible Child, 2nd Ed.

Her popular book for teens, How to Say No and Keep Your Friends, 2nd Ed., empowers kids to stand out,not just fit in!

A follow-up book for teens, When to Say Yes! And Make More Friends, shows adolescents how to select and meet quality friends and, in general, feel good for doing and being good.

Sharon also has a charming series of five books for elementary-age children each teaching an important living skill and "co-authored" with her savvy cocker spaniel Nicholas who makes the learning fun.Their book on managing elementary-age peer pressure is titled Too Smart for Trouble.
Sharon Scott

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Sharon ScottInterior Decorating Ideas for Your HomeEmotional and Social Well-beingBy Sonya WeissFor Interior Decorating Not seeing the potential in a piece of furniture can lead to regrets. I'm usually pretty good at looking past the current condition of any item and picturing it as it could be. But I made a mistake recently that I really regret. I had...Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids