toddler ipad

Sharon Scott, LPC, LMFT – For years, child-development specialists have warned that prolonged screen time is a detriment to a child’s emotional and cognitive growth.

Glenn Sparks, professor of communications at Purdue University says, As we erect screens in our public places, where casual interaction normally takes place, we do damage to interactions that foster community and civility. There are unique benefits that come from people who are physical casual for us. Strong ties in society are obviously important. However, weak ties also prove important by holding society together. Andrew Ledbetter, professor of communications of Texas Christian University that face-to-face, off-line contact and talking on the telephone is what drives closeness.

When I walk into the waiting room of my counseling office, I almost always see the parents and the child texting or reading e-mail. It’s silent as they are not interacting with one another. Same situation when I have a couple come for counseling,and everyone wonders why they can’t get along!

The Dallas Morning News recently reported that Mr. Sparks said that our brains are being overtaxed as all the switching required with technology puts processing demands on our brain.

I remember when I had one of my dogs in obedience class some years ago that the instructor said that the dogs would probably sleep on the way home as they were processing what they learned and to let them sleep. Now we have research to back that up. Loren Frank, a physiologist at the University of California, San Francisco, reports that in animal studies that any time they stop and take a break, the hippocampus works and seems to be rehearsing or rehashing what they’ve learned during the awake state.

Suggestions to teach your child (and yourself):

1. Do not allow texting or e-mailing or talking on the phone during face-to-face conversations, obviously including meal times.

2. When you see your child after school, they need some down time to let the day’s learning sink in before immediately being rushed to activities or beginning homework.

3. When in the car I would suggest the old-fashioned idea of interacting with one another verbally.

4. Stop overscheduling your children,or allowing them to do so. Kids who are involved in too many activities often have trouble sleeping (they can’t wind down), can become anxious, may develop perfectionistic tendencies and are usually exhausted.

5. Definitely limit the amount of time your child spends in front of screens. If the child won’t shut it off at the time you request, then it needs to be removed as a privilege.

Copyright © 2014, Sharon Scott. No reproduction without written permission from author.

P.S. Please see my other column SmileNotes.

 

P.S. Please see my other column SmileNotes.


 

 

Sharon Scott

Sharon Scott

Sharon is the author of eight award-winning books including four on the topic of peer to peer pressure.

The guide for parents/educators on how to peer-proof children and teens is Peer Pressure Reversal: An Adult Guide to Developing a Responsible Child, 2nd Ed.

Her popular book for teens, How to Say No and Keep Your Friends, 2nd Ed., empowers kids to stand out,not just fit in!

A follow-up book for teens, When to Say Yes! And Make More Friends, shows adolescents how to select and meet quality friends and, in general, feel good for doing and being good.

Sharon also has a charming series of five books for elementary-age children each teaching an important living skill and "co-authored" with her savvy cocker spaniel Nicholas who makes the learning fun.Their book on managing elementary-age peer pressure is titled Too Smart for Trouble.
Sharon Scott

Latest posts by Sharon Scott (see all)

https://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/toddler-ipad.jpghttps://www.familiesonlinemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/toddler-ipad-150x150.jpgSharon Scott, LPC, LMFTCounselor's Cornercomputer,home computer,Internet,mobile phone,Overtaxing Kids,parents,screen time,Technology,textingSharon Scott, LPC, LMFT - For years, child-development specialists have warned that prolonged screen time is a detriment to a child's emotional and cognitive growth. Glenn Sparks, professor of communications at Purdue University says, As we erect screens in our public places,...Parenting Advice and Family Fun Activities