child development

 

newborn baby infant
baby 3 -6 months
 age 7 months to 12 months
toddler 12 months -3 years
preschoolers
preteen, adolescent, ''tween
teen teenagers

 Baby Formula

 Breastfeeding

breastfeeding breastfeeding


 

Child Development by age 24 month
(2 years old)


Children develop at their own pace, so it's impossible to tell exactly when yours will learn a given skill. The developmental milestones below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect as your child gets older, but don't be alarmed if your child's development is not exactly as listed .

Social Skills

  • Imitates behavior of others, especially adults and older children
  • More aware of herself as separate from others
  • More excited about company of other children

Emotional Development

  • Demonstrates increasing independence
  • Begins to show defiant behavior
  • Separation anxiety increases toward midyear then fades

Cognitive Development

  • Finds objects even when hidden under two or three covers
  • Begins to sort by shapes and colors
  • Begins make-believe play

Language skills

  • Points to object or picture when it's named for him
  • Recognizes names of familiar people, objects, and body parts
  • Says several single words (by 15 to 18 months)
  • Uses simple phrases (by 18 to 24 months)
  • Uses 2- to 4-word sentences
  • Follows simple instructions
  • Repeats words overheard in conversation

Movement

  • Walks alone
  • Pulls toys behind her while walking
  • Carries large toy or several toys while walking
  • Begins to run
  • Stands on tiptoe
  • Kicks a ball
  • Climbs onto and down from furniture unassisted
  • Walks up and down stairs holding on to support

Hand and Finger Skills

  • Scribbles on his or her own
  • Turns over container to pour out contents
  • Builds tower of four blocks or more
  • Might use one hand more often than the other

Health Issues
Tell your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range.

  • Cannot walk by 18 months
  • Fails to develop a mature heel-toe walking pattern after several months of walking, or walks only on his toes
  • Does not speak at least 15 words
  • Does not use two-word sentences by age 2
  • By 15 months, does not seem to know the function of common household objects (brush, telephone, bell, fork, spoon)
  • Does not imitate actions or words by the end of this period
  • Does not follow simple instructions by age 2
  • Cannot push a wheeled toy by age 2
source: Center for Disease Control

The Canadian Association of Optometrists (CAO) is pleased to announce that this year's Eye Health Month theme is Look. See. Learn. The focus is children's vision and the importance of eye exams in early childhood to detect and prevent serious eye disease.

Since 80 per cent of classroom learning is visual, it's extremely important for parents to have their children's eyes tested prior to them starting school. School children with poor eyesight may fail to progress educationally and could even exhibit reading or learning disabilities.

"It's so important that children's eyes are checked thoroughly by an optometrist when they're young. Even if they have 20/20 vision they can still have other problems with their eyes," says Lil Linton, president of CAO. "A lot of parents don't realize this."

The CAO published the Frequency of Exam Examinations - Guideline in the Canadian Journal of Optometry, Vol. 73, # 4, Fall, 2011. These updated guidelines recommend that children's eye be tested for the first time when they are between 6 months - 24 months; followed by one eye exam each year between the ages of 2 and 19 years.



More Parenting Tips for 2 Year Olds

Child Separation Anxiety

Toddler Temper Tantrums

Why Won't My Toddler Eat?

Positive Discipline for a Happy Toddler

Child Language Development

Preventing Sibling Rivalry

Two Year Olds Learning Fine Motor Skills

Child Development by age 24 months (2 years old)
child development

 

newborn baby infant
baby 3 -6 months
 age 7 months to 12 months
toddler 12 months -3 years

school age child development preteen, adolescent, ''tween
teen teenagers

 Baby Formula

 Breastfeeding

breastfeeding breastfeeding


 

Child Development by age 24 month
(2 years old)


Children develop at their own pace, so it's impossible to tell exactly when yours will learn a given skill. The developmental milestones below will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect as your child gets older, but don't be alarmed if your child's development is not exactly as listed .

Social Skills

  • Imitates behavior of others, especially adults and older children
  • More aware of herself as separate from others
  • More excited about company of other children

Emotional Development

  • Demonstrates increasing independence
  • Begins to show defiant behavior
  • Separation anxiety increases toward midyear then fades

Cognitive Development

  • Finds objects even when hidden under two or three covers
  • Begins to sort by shapes and colors
  • Begins make-believe play

Language skills

  • Points to object or picture when it's named for him
  • Recognizes names of familiar people, objects, and body parts
  • Says several single words (by 15 to 18 months)
  • Uses simple phrases (by 18 to 24 months)
  • Uses 2- to 4-word sentences
  • Follows simple instructions
  • Repeats words overheard in conversation

Movement

  • Walks alone
  • Pulls toys behind her while walking
  • Carries large toy or several toys while walking
  • Begins to run
  • Stands on tiptoe
  • Kicks a ball
  • Climbs onto and down from furniture unassisted
  • Walks up and down stairs holding on to support

Hand and Finger Skills

  • Scribbles on his or her own
  • Turns over container to pour out contents
  • Builds tower of four blocks or more
  • Might use one hand more often than the other

Health Issues
Tell your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range.

  • Cannot walk by 18 months
  • Fails to develop a mature heel-toe walking pattern after several months of walking, or walks only on his toes
  • Does not speak at least 15 words
  • Does not use two-word sentences by age 2
  • By 15 months, does not seem to know the function of common household objects (brush, telephone, bell, fork, spoon)
  • Does not imitate actions or words by the end of this period
  • Does not follow simple instructions by age 2
  • Cannot push a wheeled toy by age 2
source: Center for Disease Control

The Canadian Association of Optometrists (CAO) is pleased to announce that this year's Eye Health Month theme is Look. See. Learn. The focus is children's vision and the importance of eye exams in early childhood to detect and prevent serious eye disease.

Since 80 per cent of classroom learning is visual, it's extremely important for parents to have their children's eyes tested prior to them starting school. School children with poor eyesight may fail to progress educationally and could even exhibit reading or learning disabilities.

"It's so important that children's eyes are checked thoroughly by an optometrist when they're young. Even if they have 20/20 vision they can still have other problems with their eyes," says Lil Linton, president of CAO. "A lot of parents don't realize this."

The CAO published the Frequency of Exam Examinations - Guideline in the Canadian Journal of Optometry, Vol. 73, # 4, Fall, 2011. These updated guidelines recommend that children's eye be tested for the first time when they are between 6 months - 24 months; followed by one eye exam each year between the ages of 2 and 19 years.



More Parenting Tips for 2 Year Olds

Child Separation Anxiety

Toddler Temper Tantrums

Why Won't My Toddler Eat?

Positive Discipline for a Happy Toddler

Child Language Development

Preventing Sibling Rivalry

Two Year Olds Learning Fine Motor Skills