Water Conservation Ideas for the Kitchen Sink

It can sometimes be difficult to visualize the importance and direct effect that simple conservation efforts can have when we are bombarded with negative information regularly. Lets take a look at what a few changes in the activities around the kitchen sink can do.

Rather than running the tap when cleaning vegetables, use a bowl of water. Later, reuse it to water outdoor plants. Reusing water from rinsing out the coffeepot for outdoor plants, the compost or lawn is something we do all the time. Rich in nitrogen as well as some trace minerals, coffeepots should be diluted with water before using. Choose a different group of plants every day and you may find you no longer have to water or fertilize them very often at all. Cooking water (pasta, steamed vegetables, boiled potatoes etc.) can be used in the same way – just let it cool first. All of these water sources contain extra nutrients that will aid your gardens immensely. Very hot cooking water can be used to kill weeds – simply pour it directly on the weed and around its roots.

After meals, scrape your dishes into the compost bucket before rinsing. While rinsing, place other soiled dishes, jars and utensils underneath while you work; it will begin the presoaking process – reducing labor and water use. Anything caught in the sink basket can be contributed to the compost, too.

Save about 5 gallons of water per washing by doing dishes in a few inches of hot soapy water. It may seem funny to do this – but by turning the hot water tap on to rinse the dishes into the sink the level will slowly increase and will maintain a hot temperature. This way, another sink full of water solely for rinsing is no longer necessary. We sometimes use rinse water to pre-soak stuck on dishes as well.

In the winter, the water from washing or soaking dishes should be left to cool. This way it releases its valuable heat into the home, rather than the sewer. Dishwashers, that are not built-in, allow reuse of the water for pre-rinsing heavily soiled dishes because they drain into the sink. The water can be trapped in the sink, or a soiled pot, where the heat is slowly released into the home, saving energy costs in the winter. Of course, the opposite applies in the summer, when extra heat is not desirable.

Very hot water is not always necessary for all washing and rinsing needs. Usually, by the time we are finished washing our hands, the water is just beginning to warm up – so really, all we have done is heat up our pipes. We can conserve water easily by turning off the tap while lathering hands. The running water is really only necessary for initial wetting, then rinsing – so running water in between is really a waste.
Now, if you measured the amount of water saved each day by those simple methods we just described – there would be dozens of gallons of pure, drinkable water left untouched in the reservoir. By reducing hot water consumption, our energy bills are a little bit smaller. All this, just from the kitchen sink!

Trash Talk Book Cover

 

Article written by Dave and Lillian Brummet based on the concept of their book, Trash Talk. The book offers useful solutions for the individual to reduce waste and better manage resources. A guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment.

save environmentBetween the two of them, Dave and Lillian Brummet are authors, poets,
photographers and book reviewers – their work has appeared in a variety of
North American publications. Lillian’s poetry book, Towards Understanding –
a collection of 120 poems, is now available. She is also a book reviewer for
Book Ideas. The couple’s column, Trash Talk, was developed into book by the
same name and released August 2nd, 2004. In 2005, the Brummets were honored
with an award for “outstanding use of various media in ongoing outreach work
to reduce waste in our environment” by the Recycling Council of British
Columbia. More recently, Dave and Lillian were awarded a Certificate of
Appreciation for volunteer contributions to Seeds of Diversity, an
organization dedicated to rescuing rare or endangered seeds from extinction.

Ann Safford

Ann is a writer who lives in Massachusetts with her husband, three children and a multitude of pets including her dog, two cats, a horse and six chickens.She enjoys writing about natural living, simple lifestyles and frugal living.Her hobbies include spending time with her family, horseback riding and gardening.

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https://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2018/10/drops-of-water-578897_1280-1024x682.jpghttps://imgsub.familiesonlinemagazine.com/uploads/2018/10/drops-of-water-578897_1280-150x150.jpgAnn SaffordPositively GreenGreen LivingWater Conservation Ideas for the Kitchen Sink by Dave and Lillian Brummet It can sometimes be difficult to visualize the importance and direct effect that simple conservation efforts can have when we are bombarded with negative information regularly. Lets take a look...Parenting Advice| Family Fun Activities for Kids